Archives For Sarah Hathaway

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By Sarah Hathaway, head of ACCA UK

We teamed up with the New Statesman to discuss this subject matter at the three party conferences – see a link to the report at the bottom of this blog, but here is my takeaway.

I think you would be hard pressed to find someone who does not think business cares about politics; politicians set the framework in which business operates, a working relationship is paramount. But do politicians care about business; does it only care about a certain type of business? This was the broader theme for the discussion.

The last few years have been difficult; the pressure on the public purse was always going to lead to trade-offs and some issues taking prevalence. And our members support austerity (mild or severe) if imposed at the right pace.

However if recovery is to continue, access to finance is key. As an organisation that supports members from small to large businesses, we recognise that their needs are distinct but that they are also intertwined; businesses do not operate in silos, they are party of a larger supply chain. We are keen to push all three of the parties to continue to champion alternative forms of finance and access to it. We know from our members that this is crucial and the small business bill has taken steps to improve this. There is some evidence that all parties recognise the importance of it but it’s about making sure the practical regulation works for business.

The issue of Europe was unsurprisingly part of the debate at Conservatives; as a global organisation we recognise the need for stability, that’s what our members want and that’s what is needed for businesses to attract long-term sustainable investment. Why would we cut ties with our biggest trading partner? That’s not to say reform isn’t needed, but reform from within not from the outside.

Of course discussing Europe involves a debate around immigration; that debate must be an honest one. We have a skills gap and so while we are working to plug that over the medium-term, we still need to fill it in the short-term. We believe all parties need to recognise that and taking students out of the net migration figure and treating them as a talent pipeline for business will help achieve that.

Ultimately politics involves trade-offs and risks, much in the way business does, but it is about calculated risk, evidence and taking a long-term view.

Politics is at its best when it recognises that it doesn’t have all the answers and that it shouldn’t try to. Instead as with any good relationship, the success comes through hard work, collaboration and concession on both sides.

To download a copy of the report click here.

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By Sarah Hathaway, head of ACCA UK

Last week I had the honour of being part of the judging panel for the British Accountancy Awards 2014. Since the Awards were re-launched four years ago, ACCA has been proud to be involved as the lead partner and we are pleased to have seen a year on year increase in terms of both the number and quality of entries received.

The most interesting and important categories for me have been those which recognise the ‘Independent Firm of the Year’ across the UK’s various regions. These provide a valuable opportunity for smaller practices to demonstrate how they have both adjusted to and thrived during what have proved to be challenging times for our economy. I was also a judge in 2013 and I continue to be delighted to see great examples of the focus, drive and innovation that has led to increases in turnover, profit and – most importantly of all – client satisfaction.

If you are part of a practice which has a good story to tell, please seriously consider entering in 2015. For a flavour of what it’s all about, why not consider attending this year’s awards’ ceremony in London on Tuesday 25 November? You will be able to meet some of the short-listed firms, individuals and previous winners. I promise you will be inspired!

For more information visit www.britishaccountancyawards.co.uk