Archives For digital service delivery

Digital service delivery

By Jeff Thomson, CMA, CAE, IMA President and CEO

Automation: we’re seeing it everywhere – from checkout lines at supermarkets to the way accounting departments file reports. These days, it seems that most organisations across a wide array of industries are employing some kind of digital service delivery. The goal: to increase efficiency, customer satisfaction, and market penetration.

While some new companies may be fully digital from the start, most organisations are at an intermediate stage, adopting tools such as self-service bots on retail websites, finding value in the analysis of large data sets, or using the eXtensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL) to file statutory returns electronically.

Exploiting such emerging technologies as web-based business processes, e-commerce, mobile commerce (m-commerce), and cloud-based software and services can enable an organisation to:

  • automate repetitive and time-consuming tasks
  • streamline complex business processes
  • replace human interaction with machine-to-machine and person-to-machine interaction
  • reshape business models to make the most of available resources
  • access and provide public services more easily and cheaply, and
  • monetise underused assets.

Take XBRL, for example. So far, most XBRL adoption has been driven by regulatory compliance. This has improved data access for investors and other stakeholders all over the world. But it could do even more to enhance the automated exchange of data internally and along supply chains. How? If businesses and professional bodies around the world can co-operate to produce the required taxonomies, if software developers strengthen their existing products and create new ones, and if businesses advocate for change – the positive impact of XBRL could be even greater. (Of course, it’s also possible that another technology could come along and make XBRL obsolete).

Further, as more and more accounting services are provided digitally, there may even be a dis-intermediation of the accountant’s role in regulatory compliance. The systems of businesses and those of regulators could eventually become so interconnected that they can exchange information automatically after it has been verified by smart software.

The fact is, if firms don’t embrace automation and enhance their services, they risk obsolescence. According to a report by ACCA and IMA, Digital Darwinism: Thriving in the Face of Technology Change, the majority of accountants intend to avoid this: 64% said they expect to embrace digital service delivery within the next two years and 31% said they’ll do so within two to five years.

While some firms and organisations are using digital technologies to provide real-time collaborative advice and services, others may need to do more. Those that miss the window of opportunity risk becoming casualties of ‘Digital Darwinism’. Fortunately, the evolutionary process brings both good news and bad: No entity is too big to fail or too small to succeed.

Read more about the technology trends that are impacting the accounting profession at www.roleofcfo.com.

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Helen Brand video-8656

By Helen Brand OBE, Chief Executive, ACCA

The second ACCA and IMA CFO Month starts today, and this year we are focussing on all things digital.

Today we live in an era of ‘digital Darwinism’, a time where technology and society are evolving faster than many organisations can adapt to the changes. This is one of the many underlying factors that led to the demise of stores such as Blockbuster and Borders. Yet technological advances continue to drive economic growth.

As trusted advisers to business, accountants and finance professionals around the world are expected to lead, not follow. The profession has historically been quick to identify and then exploit the huge potential of emerging technologies – from the earliest known records of commerce, to the earliest commercial computer systems.

Accountants’ enthusiastic use of the first programmable computers and widespread adoption of the spreadsheet helped to turn accountancy into the profession it is today; embracing of emerging technologies will turn it into the profession it aspires to be tomorrow.

Many new technologies have the capacity to influence the future of business and the accountancy profession, over the next decade and beyond.

ACCA and IMA’s latest report Digital Darwinism: thriving in the face of technology change, focuses on 10 technology trends with the potential to reshape the profession and business landscape significantly. These are developments that will change the way people live and work, and responses to them will determine the future success of individuals, organisations, and even countries.

The 10 technology trends that will have the potential to significantly reshape the business and accountancy landscape are:

  1. mobile;
  2. big data;
  3. artificial intelligence and robotics;
  4. cyber security;
  5. educational;
  6. the cloud;
  7. payment systems;
  8. virtual and augmented reality;
  9. digital service delivery;
  10. social.

Over the coming weeks during CFO Month 2014 we will be looking at some of these trends in a little more detail. In the meantime, to find out more about the technology trends impacting on the accountancy profession, please read the full report.