A talented generation could be lost if professions do not help with open access

accapr —  27 October 2014 — Leave a comment

SH  01

By Sarah Hathaway, head of ACCA UK

For those of you who have not yet seen, ACCA UK has launched Who accounts for social mobility? This paper was based on a survey of our members and students. Firstly thank you to all of you who took the time to take part in the survey your feedback was very insightful and highlighted what diversity there is among both students and members, across geography, age, gender and background.

Open access is at the heart of what ACCA believes; an open society is a fair one. We conducted the survey to get a greater understanding of whether what we are doing to encourage this is working, and to get a clearer picture of what you think. From the results, and other research and initiatives we are involved in we believe the government and business is not doing enough to ensure that everyone can get to the top.

Last Monday the government’s Social Mobility and Child Poverty Commission launched its annual State of the Nation Report which looks at the UK as a whole to see whether the government is doing enough to ensure it reaches its child poverty targets and that social mobility is improving. Unfortunately much like our report, the Commission found the government to be lacking; we do face losing a talented generation if we do not do more.

The government claims to be focused on an inclusive growth agenda, but studies demonstrate that western countries with low social mobility have lower economic growth. If both the government and the opposition do not begin to take social mobility more seriously, we will become a permanently divided nation. To start with we would like to see a commitment from all three of the political parties to end the abuse of unpaid internships and ensure that businesses are advertising them freely and fairly to all. We were concerned to see that 43% of those who took our survey said they were unpaid, it simply isn’t good enough and both government and business must end this practice.

Secondly we would like to see a commitment to more effective dissemination of careers advice through the education system. As our own social mobility research shows, very few accountants find their way into the profession via their school or university. Improving teachers’ and careers advisers’ understanding of accountancy would make a significant contribution to improving access to the field, thus increasing social mobility.

Ahead of the UK general election in May, we will be working with the government and the Commission to look at what we believe should be done and how we can contribute. We are going to be hosting several roundtable discussions in Scotland, England and Wales working with a whole host of organisations to look at what is required to make sure that no one feels there is a glass ceiling.

Do keep an eye out on Twitter, Linkedin and Google+, as well as here, where we will keep you updated on our progress.

Advertisements

No Comments

Be the first to start the conversation!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s