Public bodies, as well as governments around the world, must act on social mobility

accapr —  28 August 2014 — 1 Comment

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By Sarah Hathaway, head of ACCA UK

The results of the Social Mobility and Child Poverty Commission survey give cause for grave concern and demonstrate that not enough is being done to prevent Britain remaining an exclusive ‘club’ at the top of our society. Relative social mobility, the extent to which an individual’s chances depend on their parent’s class or income, seems to be shrinking.

This summer Thomas Picketty’s book Capital: in the 21st Century reignited a debate for western governments to address the issue of inequality. The book has ignited political discussion across Western Europe; Picketty’s central thesis is where the rate of return on capital outstrips economic growth, wealth inequality ineluctably rises. The impressive amount of data he uses to back up his thesis is why the book has received such acclaim. However despite the excitement which surrounded the book and a call for action, today’s survey results are a reminder that clearly concern about inequality and social mobility has not translated into action. Or that any action has taken effect?

In our recent submission to the Social Mobility and Child Poverty Commission’s State of the Nation report we called on an end to unpaid internships and a recent survey of our members showed us that not only do our members feel strongly on this issue but 76% of the 1,500 surveyed also felt their companies should pay the living wage. Social mobility cannot be viewed in isolation and the level of income inequality is an issue that all three of the parties should address. The report recognises that practical steps can be taken to prevent the drive towards improving social mobility settling into a pedestrian pace.

The commission has rightly called on government to collect data on its staff and lead by example and we hope the government will take note of this. ACCA is currently working to do the same; a founding feature of ACCA is accessibility and we continually review our policies to ensure that our qualification is open to everyone whatever their background.

Today’s results demonstrate that we cannot afford to soften and settle into a pedestrian pace, but the reality is that change is slow. Inter-generational mobility, as the name suggests, takes a lifetime to achieve. There is a need for practical solutions and we urge organisations of all sizes to adopt the Professions for Good Social Mobility Toolkit. The toolkit does not claim to be a silver bullet but is designed for organisations to be able to tailor it according to resource. Built from the ground up, the toolkit is fit for use by small employer organisations with no dedicated HR functions, with easy low-cost recommendations.

The SMCP Commission’s survey has done well to put further pressure on governments to act – public bodies must ensure they do too.

ACCA will be publishing a report on social mobility in the autumn.

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One response to Public bodies, as well as governments around the world, must act on social mobility

  1. 

    thanks a lot, am still doing second level acca.

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