Black hole in school careers advice means lack of knowledge of professional qualifications

accapr —  11 August 2014 — Leave a comment

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By Sarah Hathaway, head of ACCA UK

For many young people, this time of year is filled with anticipation, maybe even fear, and then hopefully reward once those hard-fought results are confirmed. Those of us that took our GCSEs and A levels over 20 years ago may struggle to remember the details of results day, but I for one can remember being paralysed with indecision as to ‘what next’.

It’s still the case in many schools that university is ‘the’ recommended destination, at any cost, but even then it’s which university, which course, which career. You would hope these students are also aware of other routes to a valuable career – school leaver schemes, apprenticeships, further education, professional education… ‘How do I make that seemingly all-important decision’ and ‘who do I turn to for advice’ are definitely on the FAQ list for August. However, new research from The Student Room says there is a “black hole” in school careers advice.

From a personal perspective, I usually offer a couple of pieces of advice when I meet young people looking for some insight. Firstly, never assume your next decision is your last. Where your career path starts does not dictate where it ends up. I can speak from experience there – and you will have many opportunities to change direction, specialise or do further study. Modern careers are not as linear as they used to be, and employers do value a wide range of experience, if you know how to sell them the benefits of that variety in experience.

Secondly, seek advice and information from as many different sources as possible. That may be parents, friends’ parents, their work colleagues, your work experience mentor, teachers, careers specialists. There are often lots of people willing to share their own perspective, if you just ask. But everyone’s knowledge is limited in one way or another, so gathering as much as possible before making a decision is important.

And this is true for many people. At ACCA we have people joining us who have made a decision to be an accountant in their 20s, 30s, 40s, even 50s! People who may have been working in finance for a while who have decided to build on their experience, mums coming back into the workplace, those who have worked in an entirely different sector and want a change. The majority of these people too will have tapped into advice from a number of different contacts or places. And they’ve made a decision that, at that point in time, a professional accountancy qualification is the route for them. If you’re 18 and looking for an alternative to university, it may be the right decision for you too.

Many of the A-level students who get their results this week are on their way to becoming a finance professional without even realising it. Three GCSEs and two A levels (including maths and English) is enough to pursue ACCA’s globally recognised qualification, which is a badge of credibility with employers.

Find out more about studying to become an ACCA finance professional.

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