The talent challenge – creating development paths in the retained function in country

accapr —  22 July 2013 — 1 Comment

By Barry Patton, finance director Ireland, Intel

The finance organisation at Intel is very much an influential finance operation in the sense that we report directly through the finance organisation to the CFO, and we have a key role to play in continuously challenging and helping drive value for the operations – so we are very business and operational impact focused. However, with the advent of our shared service operation, both transactional finance plus ‘higher value’ finance roles moved across.

From a retained finance function perspective this has created specific talent development challenges for us because many of our entry roles to develop our talent were lost, resulting in a retained finance organisation structure which had small numbers of finance personnel at more junior roles, small numbers at very senior roles, and too many roles in the middle – so essentially a circular shaped, rather than pyramid shaped organisational structure impacting on traditional career development paths. There may be very rational reasons why, from a cost and standardisation perspective, shared services makes sense, but it has development and succession implications for the retained finance team which are not always thought through.

Solutions – creating development paths in the retained function

  1. Carve out new roles to facilitate development. We have systematically carved out roles, creating for example two junior roles rather than one senior post. This starts to rebalance the retained finance organisational structure and open up more career paths but critically it also allows us to intervene at the junior level and give people opportunities to develop the skills they will need upwards – we can take them on the journey and these are skills you can’t learn coming straight in at a senior level. It’s cost neutral but of course there is a headcount implication and we get measured on both – so we have to make the case consistently.
  2. Support development opportunities through rigorous talent identification programmes. We have a talent identification process in place called ‘repeat high performers’ – each year one-fifth of our staff will be given this performance rating and if they meet this two years in a row, this categorises you as high potential which helps drive mobility because hiring managers become interested in you and from a corporate standpoint at a manager level it puts these individuals on everyone’s ‘radar’.
  3. Create influence in the business and maintain finance ‘connectivity’ by exporting finance talent. We try and give finance people business operational experience. This allows us to retain finance staff outside of the finance function so that if we have a major capability issue in the function we can reach back out to the business and bring people back. We also adopt the same approaches across our geographic regions, monitoring which finance people are where and fitting them into the overall succession planning cycle. This is also critical in creating a strong finance reputation within the business and ensuring we are truly connected to the operation.

This case study appeared in an ACCA report on Talent and capability in global finance functions. As part of ACCA’s qualitative research leading organisations shared their approaches.

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