Is CFO finance technology over promising?

accapr —  20 February 2014 — 2 Comments

Jamie Lyon

By Jamie Lyon, head of corporate sector, ACCA

To my eternal dismay I don’t really get much time on the iPad these days. I don’t have to look far, however to find where it is – invariably it’s in the clutches of either my seven year old daughter (worrying), or my three year old boy (worrying, but for different reasons). Their relationship with this sort of technology however seems very intuitive, dare I say almost hardwired. Technology will be even more coded into their future daily existence, probably beyond the realms we can imagine right now. It’s fascinating to watch, and it’s an extraordinary time to be alive.

Today’s rate of advancement in technology is exponential but I can’t help but think the technology we are becoming accustomed to in our private lives isn’t quite reflected in our business lives. There is no greater example of this than what’s been happening (or not happening) in corporate finance organisations over the last decade or so. If the finance organisation is serious about driving value and supporting the business in its strategic imperatives, one of the things it has to get serious about is the technology it has at its disposal. I don’t, however, subscribe to the view that technology is the panacea to all of finance’s problems, the one-stop solution to deliver the sorts of financial and operational insights the business is crying out for… but it would be naïve to underplay its growing importance, particularly with the digitisation agenda.

So what’s stopping finance technology delivering on its promise? The obvious one is investment costs and multiple legacy ERP systems not being fit for purpose; too much manual workaround, too much time trying to get to the number rather than understanding and explaining to the business the implication of the number. Where we have seen investment in finance technology, typically the investment is focused on streamlining and driving down cost, rather than investing in the sorts of capabilities that are predictive and insightful. But there are arguably other issues too. Has finance shown the necessary finance leadership in the technology agenda? Does it truly understand and can it explain the business case for finance technology investment? Does a typical finance function “culture” present challenges to really embrace the opportunities that technology provides? Is it because finance is too risk averse? Why isn’t it adopting the cloud much? Is the payback on technology that creates insight rather than headcount reduction just too hard to quantify? Is it a capability issue with finance playing “catch up” on the skills it needs to make technology truly deliver?

Lots of questions, not many answers. We explore all of these issues and more in ACCA’s latest CFO report Is finance function technology delivering on its promise? 

I’ll leave with you a final thought – I think the corporate insight agenda offers CFOs and the finance organisation a great opportunity for internal influence and moving the dial on the corporate reputation of the finance department. I also think embracing and making the case for technology and tools is essential to achieving this. My observation is this: if finance doesn’t take this opportunity to lead the insight agenda, perhaps someone else will…

This blogpost first featured in CFO World, February 2014

2 responses to Is CFO finance technology over promising?

  1. 

    The technology market is quite vibrant at the moment – especially with the development of SaaS solutions – but it is difficult for an organisation to switch systems then it is often difficult to extract these benefits without pain. It’s a dilemma.

  2. 
    Alex Costadinou 4 April 2014 at 12:15 am

    The point focused on ERP systems not being fit for purpose is entirely dependent on the software. There are a number of ERP systems which can be customised to work directly in line with an organisation’s requirements. However, the overall cost to implement these ERP systems can be expensive which is why an effective ‘Cost-benefit analysis’ should be carefully considered.

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